Notes: Fewer than eight arms is not feasible, as there would be
periods in which no weight is applied to the ends of any of the arms.

With a greater number of arms there would be a more reliable  
constant force applied on the ends of one or more arms. However,
doubling the number of arms doubles the weight that must be lifted at
any given time to feed the arms. However, if the radial distance to the
end of an arm (or the center of the tank attached to the arm) is over
twice that of the radius to the inner tanks, leverage would be
proportionally greater with the use of additional arms, albeit with a
higher minimum necessary force.

It is also worth noting that proportionally longer arms have some
degrees less effective range once filled by the triple tanks, not only
because it takes longer for the leverage tanks to be filled, but because
the length of the arm assures that it reaches the water within fewer
degrees after the horizontal.

Curving Rail Perpetual Motion            nathancoppedge.com
NOTE and CAUTION on my diagrams in general:

All my diagrams were necessarily made at a time when I was
certain they would work. If I were not certain that they had value
of one kind or another, I would not have made them.

Because the purpose of the diagrams is, as I see it, to perpetuate
the dream of their specific instance, I can do no more than
apologize for the imperative language I inevitably use. The
imperative tone is meant to pursuade the reader not that the
concept works, but that it MIGHT work, in the broad and general
sense that perpetual motion as a whole MIGHT be possible.
Fluid Leverage Perpetual Motion Waterwheel Concept
Utilizing Leverage from Tanks at Alternate Radii

DIAGRAMS
to return from close-up view, use the BACK button.
Fluid Leverage
ABOVE: Original Concept using eight arms. Click for a closer view.
Waterwheel
ABOVE: A different waterwheel design in which water is transferred  
across the arm at the midpoint to a greater radius.
Click for a closer view.
NATHAN COPPEDGE--Perpetual Motion Concepts
MAIN

PM Theory

CONCEPTS

Grav-Buoy2

FLUID LEVER
Summary
Components
Diagrams

Curving Rail

Motive Mass

Repeat Lever

Tilt Motor

Coquette

Bezel Weight

Magnets

Grav Motor

Conv Wheels

Pendulums

Escher Mach

Spin Top

Apollo Device

Early Failures

DISCLAIMER

PM Types
NATHANCOPPEDGE.COM

IMPOSSIBLEMACHINE.COM
white elephant
Buoyant Wheel
AT LEFT: A fully buoyant
wheel using toothed
notches; presumably this
is the most foundational
idea for an ultra-simple
leverage concept of the
above constructions; Click
for a closer view.
ABOVE: THE WATER-LEVER, Nathan
Coppedge's latest design for a waterwheel-type
concept. CLICK FOR A CLOSER VIEW.